Technology & Productivity Weekly

Printer Friendly
Text Size: A A A A

May 9, 2014 Headlines

Five Ways Content Marketing Can Help Accounting Firm
The Pros and Cons of Microsoft Office for iPad
Money Management Tools Help SMBs Predict Cash Flow
Why Your Employees Are the Single Biggest Threat to Your Company's Data
Three Tips for Preparing Your Small Business for the Unexpected
Three Cybersecurity Steps You Need to Take in Response to the 'Heartbleed' Bug
Make Sure Your Enterprise Can Survive a Cloud Failure

The links at the end of each abstract are to the publisher, publication, or article. Some links may require registration or subscription. Information, Inc. is not affiliated with the referenced publications.


To The Top

Five Ways Content Marketing Can Help Accounting Firm

CPA Practice Advisor (05/01/14); Ruszczyk, Bonnie Buol

Content marketing, which is content shared via social media, newsletters, and other media, has the potential to significantly boost a firm's profile. Content marketing helps firms build their brand, while establishing their presence as a trusted source of information. Through content marketing channels, firms also build relationships and viral marketing campaigns. Prior to venturing into content marketing, firms should establish a few parameters, including clear objectives and baselines for measuring success. While implementing content marketing efforts, firms should create and define a unique position in their niche. Firms should consider the issues and topics relevant to their target audience, and keep content audience-focused. Finally, firms should explore multiple content marketing channels, including social media, blogs, industry publications, and writing guest posts on other Web sites. <a href="http://www.cpapracticeadvisor.com/news/11427485/5-ways-content-marketing-ca n-help-accounting-firms" target="_blank">Read More


To The Top

The Pros and Cons of Microsoft Office for iPad

Small Business Computing (04/17/14); Martin, James A.

Microsoft has debuted its Office for iPad offering as a solution for businesses with mobile computing needs. There are several pros of using Office for iPad, including consistent formatting across multiple platforms. The ability to dictate text and the number of available templates are also benefits of Office apps. However, some drawbacks of using Office apps include the lack of printer support, which is a major hindrance. Another disadvantage of Office for iPad is the inability to access files directly from cloud services other than OneDrive, oneDrive for Business, or SharePoint. Users with Office 365 subscriptions will receive 20GB of storage for up to five years, in addition to 60 minutes of Skype monthly; Office can be installed on up to five separate Windows or Mac computers. <a href="http://www.smallbusinesscomputing.com/News/Software/the-pros-and-cons-of-mi crosoft-office-for-ipad.html" target="_blank">Read More


To The Top

Money Management Tools Help SMBs Predict Cash Flow

Small Business Computing (04/17/14); Mays, Kim

There are two major tools small businesses can use for predicting cash flow. The first, Bill.com, features a Cash Flow Management offering that updates automatically to avoid errors. Receivables, payables, and balances can be projected up to three months, and cash transfers can be scheduled according to payment schedules. WiseCash is another Web-based tool that allows SMBs to track their payments and expenses. Via a dashboard, users can view cash flow in real-time and assist businesses with loans and increasing rates. Through WiseCash, users also receive an email weekly tracking all transactions for the upcoming two weeks, supporting payment projections. <a href="http://www.smallbusinesscomputing.com/biztools/money-management-tools-help- smbs-predict-cash-flow.html" target="_blank">Read More


To The Top

Why Your Employees Are the Single Biggest Threat to Your Company's Data

Inc.com (04/16/14); Yakowicz, Will

Risk management consultant Heather Bearfield says employees are a company's single biggest threat to data loss. Bearfield, a consultant at Marcum, says companies fail to invest in IT security, which results in significant potential for security breaches. Bearfield advises companies to educate employees about human error, especially the hazards of clicking bad links or losing removable hard drives. Bearfield recommends changing passwords every 90 days, though she says pushback on changing passwords is common. However, password security is the first layer of defense, Bearfield notes. Finally, Bearfield recommends encrypting email messages which can be simply done through automatic encryption software. <a href="http://www.inc.com/will-yakowicz/how-to-prepare-your-company-for-a-data-bre ach.html" target="_blank">Read More


To The Top

Three Tips for Preparing Your Small Business for the Unexpected

Small Business Technology (04/14/14); Ray, Ramon

Small businesses can follow three tips for preparing for the unexpected. The first is to document processes, particularly processes that are mission-critical in daily workflow. Assigning team members different tasks will prepare a business to manage and prioritize issues in the event of a disaster. Choosing an apprentice is the next step that is critical for businesses' risk management. This individual will be trained to act as a leader, and if issues arise, will be able to mitigate a catastrophic situation without panicking. Businesses should delegate tasks selectively; employees should be assigned tasks that are aligned with their talents. Management should evaluate employees' regular workloads and consider these factors while delegating tasks for service-related issues. <a href="http://www.smallbiztechnology.com/archive/2014/04/3-tips-for-preparing-your -small-business-for-the-unexpected.html" target="_blank">Read More


To The Top

Three Cybersecurity Steps You Need to Take in Response to the 'Heartbleed' Bug

Inc.com (04/09/14); Yakowicz, Will

Two years ago, the Internet encryption software OpenSSL released an updated version. However, this version was released with a security vulnerability that exposed users' passwords, financial data, and email exchanges known as the "Heartbleed bug." Through this bug, hackers could access the memory of Web systems encrypted via OpenSSL software. Consequently, businesses are being urged to upgrade to the latest version of OpenSSL which prompts users to change their passwords and includes security patches. Companies can prevent security hacks via the Heartbleed bug by following three steps, the first of which is updating their current version of OpenSSL. Users should then be prompted to change their usernames and passwords, including a password-change cycle that includes changing passwords in a week, then a month. Finally, businesses should heavily invest cybersecurity controls to prevent the critical loss of assets via an attack like the Heartbleed bug. <a href="http://www.inc.com/will-yakowicz/3-things-you-need-to-do-after-affected-hea rtbleed.html" target="_blank">Read More


To The Top

Make Sure Your Enterprise Can Survive a Cloud Failure

Processor.com (04/04/14) Vol. 36, No. 7, P. 16

Although cloud providers are generally reliable, no provider can guarantee a 100 percent uptime. To safeguard a firm against a cloud outage, a few precautions should be followed. First, firms should create a business disaster recovery plan. Data should be constantly backed up with built-in redundancies, automatic failover, and contingency plans should be created. Manual systems should also be created in advance so firms will not be in panic-mode in the event of a cloud outage. Firms should check with the service levels guaranteed by every vendor used, including understanding where data is backed up and the protocol executed for restoring data. Read More


To The Top


LAST UPDATED 5/9/2014